Prof. Min Chen, University of Oxford, UK, first keynote speaker at VINCI 2018

June 27th, 2018 by Diana Unander

We have the pleasure to present the first keynote speech at VINCI 2018 : Is Visualization Underpinned by Communication Theory? held by Prof. Min Chen from University of Oxford, UK. You can find information on how to register for VINCI 2018 here

Abstract: Seven decades ago, Claude Shannon’s landmark article “A Mathematical Theory of Communication” (1948) laid down the foundation of modern tele- and data communication, giving rise to information theory as an academic subject. In this talk, the speaker will describe the applications of information theory to visualization and demonstrate how information theory can explain numerous phenomena in visualization. In particular, the speaker will discuss an information-theoretic metric for analysing the cost-benefit of data intelligence workflows, elaborating the values of visualization in such workflows. The speaker will also outline conjectures that the metric may potentially have implications beyond data science.

Short Bio: Min Chen developed his academic career in Wales between 1984 and 2011. He is currently the professor of scientific visualization at Oxford University and a fellow of Pembroke College. His research interests include visualization, computer graphics, human-computer interaction, and aspects of computer vision. He has co-authored some 200 publications, including his recent contributions in areas such as theory of visualization, video visualization, visual analytics, and perception and cognition in visualization. He has worked on a broad spectrum of interdisciplinary research topics, ranging from the sciences to sports, and from digital humanities to cybersecurity. His services to the research community include papers co-chair of IEEE Visualization 2007 and 2008, Eurographics 2011, IEEE VAST 2014 and 2015; co-chair of Volume Graphics 1999 and 2006, EuroVis 2014; associate editor-in-chief of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics; and co-director of Wales Research Institute of Visual Computing. He is currently an editor-in-chief of Computer Graphics Forum. He is a fellow of British Computer Society, European Computer Graphics Association, and Learned Society of Wales. See also: https://sites.google.com/site/drminchen/

Diana Unander

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