Archive for December, 2017

Seminar in Statistics “Estimating deformation of polar ice”

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

The department of statistics would like to invite you to the Seminar in Statistics that will be held at their department on December 12th. The presentation under title “Estimating deformation of polar ice” will be given by Professor Aila Särkkä from Chalmers University of Technology. Seminar starts at 14:00 in room K2084V. No sign-up is required.

 

Abstract:

Analysis of deep polar ice cores has become an important tool for deriving climate information from the past. Interpretation of ice core records requires an accurate dating of the ice. The recent dating relies on models where the key element is the simulation of the individual history of ice deformation for each specific core site. We present a two-stage method for the estimation of the deformation history in polar ice using the measured anisotropy of air inclusions from deep ice cores. First, we fit ellipsoids to the pattern of point-to-point distance vectors to estimate the direction of anisotropy. Then, we estimate the scale of anisotropy by identifying the back-transformation resulting in the most isotropic pattern. Finally, the method is applied to estimate the compression in polar ice air bubble patterns.

For more information please contact: Jolanta Pielaszkiewicz, jolanta.pielaszkiewicz@lnu.se

Digital Humanities Seminar: Open Data in the Age of Big Data Capitalism – Arwid Lund

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Arwid Lund, Senior Lecturer at the Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Linnaeus University will give a talk within the emerging field of Digital Humanities (DH) that is a part of the DH Seminar series hosted by the Digital Humanities Initiative at the Linnaeus University.

  • Date: 6 December 2017
  • Time: 13:00-14:00
  • Location: K1040, Building K, Växjö

Abstract: Open Data in the Age of Big Data Capitalism, Arwid Lund

The digital world has transformed the conditions for discussing freedom within liberalism. Private property more obviously clashes with the freedom of speech (the public sphere), when the costs of mediated and reproduced art, journalism, information and literature nears zero and the exchange of these takes fluid forms, similar to social communication. The concept of “open”, similar but still opposite to “free”, has taken on an accentuated ideological importance in this context, but so have also alternative visions of intellectual commons. This article contains a case study of Open Knowledge Network’s perspective on openness’ relation to private property and capitalism in the informational field. It does so first through an analysis of the network’s understanding of the copyleft principle, and second through an analysis of the organisation’s view on open business models. A theoretical reading of classical political perspectives on the concept of freedom supports the analysis. One result is the identification of a central ideological lacuna in absent discussions of unconditionally opened-up resources that strengthen the accumulation cycle of capital. This logic favours the negative freedom of closed business models in the competition with open ones that could foster more positive notions of freedom, although open business models are generally advocated and commons are mentioned as desirable. In a dominant ideological formation, openness is used to promote its opposite in the economic field. (more…)