General

iInstitute / Digital Humanities webinar: The Ethics of Datafication and AI by Geoffrey Rockwell

Tuesday, May 18th, 2021

Summary – We all want artificial intelligence to be responsible, trustworthy, and good… the question is how to get beyond principles and check lists. In this paper I will argue for the importance of the data used in training machines, especially when it comes to avoiding bias. Further, I will argue that there is a role for humanists and others who have been concerned with the datafication of the cultural record for some time. Not only have we traditionally been concerned with social, political and ethical issues, but we have developed practices around the curation of the cultural record. We need to ask about the ethics around big data and the creation of training sets. We need to advocate for an ethic of care and repair when it comes to digital archives that can have cascading impact.

About the speaker – Geoffrey Rockwell is a Professor of Philosophy and Digital Humanities, Director of the Kule Institute for Advanced Study and Associate Director of AI for Society signature area at the University of Alberta. He publishes on textual visualization, text analysis, ethics of technology and on digital humanities including a co-authored book Hermeneutica from MIT Press (2016). He is co-developer of Voyant Tools (voyant-tools.org), an award winning suite of text analysis tools. He is currently the President of the Canadian Society for Digital Humanities.

INVITATION: Applications for Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions MSCA Postdoctoral Fellowships (MSCA-PF) 2021

Tuesday, May 11th, 2021

If you work within the research areas of data intensive research and are interested in spending one or two years as a researcher at the Linnaeus University Centre for Data Intensive Sciences and Applications (DISA, https://lnu.se/en/disa), you are welcome to submit a proposal for participating in a DISA effort. DISA researches open questions in collection, analysis and utilization of large data sets applied to thematic areas such as astrophysics, mechanical engineering, construction, eHealth, social sciences, and the humanities, see details below. With its core in computer science, it takes a multidisciplinary approach and collaborates with researchers from all faculties at the university.

The effort is supported by our Grants and Innovation Office (GIO) and should lead to an application for funding from MSCA-PF, allowing you to conduct a PostDoc research project and participate in the DISA activities.

We welcome all proposals within our core and thematic research fields, but are especially interested in applications that address data intensive research conducted in or together with one of our thematic areas.

A few important:

  • May 23th 2021 – Deadline for submitting initial proposals.
  • June 4th 2021 (a.m.) – Online MSCA-PF information. Presentation of important points and formalities.
  • June 27th 2021 – Deadline for submitting first drafts of full MSCA-PF applications
  • July 1st – Feedback session between supervisors and the applicant
  • Preliminary 15 September, 5 pm (Swedish time) – Deadline for submitting MSCA-PF applications to the European commission.

The European Marie Skłodowska-Curie Postdoctoral Fellowships are open to researchers moving within Europe, as well as those coming in from other parts of the world, as long as one has not lived or worked in Sweden for more than 12 months during the last 3 years (preliminary reference date: 15 September 2021). If the application is approved, you must move to Sweden. The applicant should be an experienced researcher, meaning that she or he should hold a doctoral degree (or receive such a degree before 9/2021). There is also an upper age limit: eligible researchers have a maximum of 8 years full-time equivalent experience in research, measured from the date of award of the doctoral degree. Years of experience outside research and career breaks (e.g., due to parental leave) are deductible, similarly years outside Europe (for European citizens and long-term residents).

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Meet Keynote Virginia Dignum: Responsible AI: from principles to action

Monday, November 9th, 2020

During the Big Data Conference on December 3-4, 2020 we will have several interesting Keynote speakers, one of them is Virginia Dignum, who is a Professor of Responsible Artificial Intelligence at Umeå University, Sweden and the director of WASP-HS.

She will talk about that every day we see news about advances and the societal impact of AI. AI is changing the way we work, live and solve challenges but concerns about fairness, transparency or privacy are also growing. Ensuring an ethically aligned purpose is more than designing systems whose result can be trusted. It is about the way we design them, why we design them, and who is involved in designing them. If we are to produce responsible trustworthy AI, we need to work towards technical and socio-legal initiatives and solutions which provide concretise instructions, tools, and other means of dictating, helping, and educating AI practitioners at aligning their systems with our societies’ principles and values.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to listen to her and take part of the conference by signing up here by November 25th.

Virginia Dignum (photo: Mattias Pettersson(photo: Mattias Pettersson)

More information about Virginia Dignum, Professor of Responsible Artificial Intelligence at Umeå University, Sweden and associated with the TU Delft in the Netherlands. She is the director of WASP-HS, the Wallenberg Program on Humanities and Society for AI, Autonomous Systems and Software. She is a Fellow of the European Artificial Intelligence Association (EURAI), a member of the European Commission High Level Expert Group on Artificial Intelligence, of the working group on Responsible AI of the Global Partnership on AI (GPAI), of the World Economic Forum’s Global Artificial Intelligence Council, of the Executive Committee of the IEEE Initiative on Ethically Alligned Design, and a founding member of ALLAI-NL, the Dutch AI Alliance. Her book “Responsible Artificial Intelligence: developing and using AI in a responsible way” was published by Springer-Nature in 2019.

Keynote: Anders Arpteg: How will the recent AI-revolution change our society?

Wednesday, November 4th, 2020

During the Big Data Conference on December 3-4, 2020 we will have a several interesting Keynote speakers, one of them is Anders Arpteg, who is the Head of research at Peltarion

He will talk about that something extraordinary has happened within AI in recent years. Companies are starting to talk about moving into an AI-first future, but what does that mean? Not only are we seeing significant scientific advances in AI, but we are also seeing companies and politicians starting to invest heavily in AI. In order to stay one step ahead, we must be prepared for what is coming next. What has really happened in recent years, and what are the next steps and trends in machine learning? What should companies know to be prepared for the rapid development that is happening with ML and AI? This talk will give a glimpse into the future of AI, what possibilities it holds, and describe concrete real-world examples of how companies such as Spotify, Peltarion, and more are using the latest AI techniques.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to listen to him and take part of the conference by signing up here by November 25th.

Anders Arpteg

More information about Anders Arpteg
Anders Arpteg (Ph.D., Head of Research at Peltarion) has been working with AI for 20 years in both academia and industry, with a Ph.D. in AI from Linköping University. Worked at Spotify for many years making use of big data and machine learning techniques to optimize the user experience. Now heading up a research team at Peltarion, operationalizing the latest and greatest AI techniques. At Peltarion, we have the ambitious goal of making deep learning and the latest AI techniques available for all companies, not just the large technology organizations. Also a member of AI Innovation of Sweden’s steering committee, AI adviser for the Swedish government, member of the Swedish AI Agenda, member of the European AI Alliance, founder of the Machine Learning Stockholm meetup group, and member of several advisory boards.

Call for presentations, Big Data Conference 2020

Friday, October 23rd, 2020

A fast-forward (FF) + virtual poster (VP) sessions will be organized as part of the Big Data Conference 2020. In the FF presentations, each participant gets to show a 3-minute video to briefly summarize her/his research. Directly after the FF,  participants will be redirected to breakout rooms where it will be possible to present their VP and interact with the interested public.

The FF+VP presentations can focus on either ongoing research or new ideas:

1) Ongoing research will focus on research recently published or at an advanced stage of elaboration. The main goal here is to present research results of general interest for the public of the conference and eventually receive feedback on ongoing work.

2) New ideas will focus on future research, plans, or simply new ideas. The goal here is to share with the public their own plans, receive feedback, find partners and possibly find synergies to develop future research together.

 Submission

To submit to the FF+VP session, participants should submit a 500-word abstract briefly presenting the research by November 9th, 2020 to Diana Unander, diana.unander@lnu.se  Each participant can submit at most two abstracts.

Acceptance information will be sent out by November 13th, 2020.

If accepted, a video (in videos in 720p and mp4 format) of maximum 3 minutes should be sent by November 24th, 2020.

For more information or questions, please contact:

Are you using Twitter? Contribute to our research!

Monday, September 28th, 2020

Dear Recipient,

We study the concept of similarity on Twitter and how similarity depends on the user profile, activity, and the structure of one’s social networks. This study is multidisciplinary between computer science and the humanities.

If you have a Twitter account, we kindly ask you to go to the link below and participate in this survey.

https://bit.ly/2RXhkY0

It is noteworthy that there are no correct answers in this survey, and we are only collecting data anonymously for fundamental research purposes.

Thanks in advance,

Research Team

Programming languages for data-Intensive HPC applications: A systematic mapping study

Wednesday, March 18th, 2020

Don’t miss out on this publication by Sabri Pllana and other researchers.

A major challenge in modelling and simulation is the need to combine expertise in both software technologies and a given scientific domain. When High-Performance Computing (HPC) is required to solve a scientific problem, software development becomes a problematic issue. Considering the complexity of the software for HPC, it is useful to identify programming languages that can be used to alleviate this issue.

Because the existing literature on the topic of HPC is very dispersed, we performed a Systematic Mapping Study (SMS) in the context of the European COST Action cHiPSet. This literature study maps characteristics of various programming languages for data-intensive HPC applications, including category, typical user profiles, effectiveness, and type of articles.

For more information about the publication see: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167819119301759?via%3Dihub

Keynote: Machine Learning for better entertainment recommendations: A Nordic perspective

Friday, November 22nd, 2019

During this years Big Data Conference at Linnaeus University on December 5-6 2019 we have several very interesting Keynote speakers, one of them is Antonina Danylenko, Head of Applied Machine Learning at The Nordic Entertainment Group who offers video-on-demand streaming, linear TV channels and radio broadcasting – probably best known for their Viaplay, Viafree & Viasat platforms.

She will talk about how the entertainment industry is transforming at a rapid rate. This is driven by new trends, growing customer expectations and AI technologies allowing for more innovation, disruption and opportunities for growth. At the same time, the industry is getting increasingly crowded – as the use of streaming services is on the rise, and the Nordic region spends more time online than ever before. Nearly four out of ten people watch video content on a daily basis, with three-quarters of the 16-24 year-old age bracket streaming that content from subscription-based services. We are seeing a new phenomenon emerge known as ‘stacking’ behaviour – where households typically subscribe to more than one service, just to keep their options open when it comes to deciding what to watch. With so many options out there, people can be paralysed by what’s known as the ‘paradox of choice.’ Personalising every aspect of the customer journey has become our main focus in the recommendation space, as consumers of entertainment have never been more spoilt for choice. Serving up relevant content recommendations at the right time is key to making the decision process as easy as possible. However, building and maintaining the lifecycle of recommender systems to capture customers’ behavior and use different algorithms to guide them towards something they will enjoy watching is not easy. In this presentation, I will outline the end-to-end process of building a recommender system utilising Big Data and Machine Learning to address this challenge.”

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to listen to him and take part of the conference by signing up here by November 25th.

More about Antonina Danylenko who holds a PhD in Computer Science from Linnaeus University, Sweden where she wrote a dissertation on the topic of “Decision Algebra: A General Approach to Learning and Using Classifiers”. After several years working at IKEA within Solution Architecture and Data Science domains , she joined the Nordic Entertainment Group—where she is now the Head of Applied Machine Learning. The Nordic Entertainment Group offers video-on-demand streaming, linear TV channels and radio broadcasting – probably best known for their Viaplay, Viafree & Viasat platforms. They’re responsible for connecting over 1.4 million subscribers to the content they love, with more than 1900 employees across the Nordics and the UK.

Keynote: Open Science with the European Open Science Cloud

Wednesday, November 20th, 2019

During this years Big Data Conference at Linnaeus University on December 5-6 2019 we have several very interesting Keynote speakers, one of them is Gergely Sipos works as Customer and Technical Outreach Manager for the EGI Foundation. He will give a talk about Open Science with the European Open Science Cloud.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity to listen to him and take part of the conference by signing up here by November 25th.

In recent years, the vision of Open Science has emerged as a new paradigm for transparent, data-driven science capable of accelerating competitiveness and innovation. The embodiment of this vision in Europe is the European Open Science Cloud (EOSC). This presentation will introduce the EOSC initiative, its current implementation from the EOSC-hub and other projects, and will show
how EOSC can already facilitate Open Science. EOSC-hub is a 33 million Euro project that started in January 2018 with the involvement of over 100 institutes. EOSC-hub defines, creates and operates the integration and management system of the EOSC. This integration and management system (the Hub) builds on mature processes, policies and tools from the leading European e-infrastructures to cover the whole life-cycle of services from planning to delivery. Through this management system online and ‘human’ services, software and data are delivered towards researchers via the EOSC Portal and its Markerplace. The Portal already includes over 100 services from 3 e-infrastructure communities (EGI, EUDAT, INDIGO-DataCloud), and from over 20 Research Infrastructures and scientific service providers. The catalogue of services is expected to radically grow in the next years. The Hub acts as a single contact point for researchers and innovators to discover, access, use and reuse a broad spectrum of services starting from baseline infrastructure services (such as HTC clusters, IaaS clouds, storage, security) to domain specific applications, datasets and portals.

You can also meet Gergely Sipos during the tutorial session about Open Science with Jupyter, Zenodo and Binder on December 4th.

More information about Gergely Sipos he coordinates EGI’s engagement programme and supports researcher communities and educators from academia and industry in tackling big-data and big-compute challenges using state of the art services from the EGI community. Gergely holds an MSc and a PhD in computer science and project management from the University of Miskolc, Hungary. He became involved in grid computing in 2002 and researched high-level user environments and collaborative design tools. Prior to EGI, Gergely worked in training, consultancy and user support for the EGEE project from his base in Budapest, where he promoted grid technology and distributed computing practices to scientific communities.