Digital humanities

DISA at ICAME 40

Monday, January 28th, 2019

The 40th Annual Conference of the International Computer Archive for Modern and Medieval English (ICAME) will be held at Université de Neuchâtel in Switzerland, June 1 – 5. ICAME is one of the most important ongoing conference series on corpus linguistics, and since this is the 40th installment it is something of an anniversary. The theme this year is “Language in Time, Time in Language”.

This year we are happy to see that we have many of our researchers connected to DISA present to represent us and the research conducted at Linnaeus University.

The conference activities connected to DISA LNU are:

  • Jukka Tyrkkö will be organizing a workshop called “Big data and the study of language and culture: Parliamentary discourse across time and space” together with Minna Korhonen and Haidee Kruger.
  • Mikko Laitinen is presenting a paper on variation in indefinite pronouns in historical American English called “Towards the Inevitable Demise of Everybody?” together with Emily Öhman and Tanja Säily.
  • Magnus Levin and Jenny Ström Herold will present on echoic binomials in an English-German-Swedish perspective as a part of the “Languages in Time, Time in Languages: Phraseological perspectives” workshop.
  • Mikko Laitinen, Jukka Tyrkkö, Magnus Levin, Alexander Lakaw and Daniel Sundberg will be presenting a paper on the use of American English and British English in the Nordic context through the Nordic Tweet Stream.

For more information about the research within the research group for Data Intensive Digital Humanities, visit their website.

/Diana

Computational Archival Science Workshop at IEEE Big Data 2018 – Call for papers

Monday, September 3rd, 2018

The organizers of the Computational Archival Science (CAS) Workshop at IEEE Big Data 2018 have issued a formal call for papers. This is the 3rd workshop at IEEE Big Data addressing CAS, following on from workshops in 2016 and 2017. All papers accepted for the workshop will be included in the Conference Proceedings published by the IEEE Computer Society Press, made available at the conference, which takes place Dec. 10-13, 2018 in Seattle, WA, USA.

The workshop will explore the conjunction (and its consequences) of emerging methods and technologies around big data with archival practice and new forms of analysis and historical, social, scientific, and cultural research engagement with archives. We aim to identify and evaluate current trends, requirements, and potential in these areas, to examine the new questions that they can provoke, and to help determine possible research agendas for the evolution of computational archival science in the coming years. At the same time, we will address the questions and concerns scholarship is raising about the interpretation of “big data” and the uses to which it is put, in particular appraising the challenges of producing quality (meaning, knowledge and value) from quantity, tracing data and analytic provenance across complex “big data” platforms and knowledge production ecosystems, and addressing data privacy issues.
Important dates:

  • Oct 8, 2018: Due date for full workshop papers submission
  • Oct 29, 2018: Notification of paper acceptance to authors
  • Nov 15, 2018: Camera-ready of accepted papers
  • Dec 10 – 13, 2018: Workshop [exact date TBD]

See the full workshop CFP to learn more, including suggested research topics and submission instructions.

Seminar invitation: Beyond programming as primary computing skill

Friday, May 18th, 2018

The Digital Humanities invite you to the seminar: Beyond programming as primary computing skill: the case of the PDF file format – Jean-François Blanchette

Jean-François Blanchette is an Associate Professor at the Department of Information Studies at UCLA. His research focuses on the computerization of bureaucracies, the evolution of the computing infrastructure, and the materiality of digital objects. He is the author of Burdens of Proof: Cryptographic Culture and Evidence Law in the Age of Electronic Documents (MIT Press, 2012) and co-editor of Regulating the Cloud: Policy for Computing Infrastructure (MIT Press, 2015). He is the director with Snowden Becker of the “On the Record, All the Time” project, which examines the impact of surveillance technologies to archival education and practice.

Abstract for the presentation:

LIS programs have been faced for years with the question of how to best teach students adequate information technology skills. In past decades, the answer often took the form of basic computing literacy (how to write an email, how to set up a basic database), but today, the consensus is that the most obvious representative of such a skill is the mastery of a programming language. Indeed, coding is supported today by a wide range of organizations as the most direct path of entry into the computing professions and as a requisite skill for all future workers in the knowledge economy.

In this presentation,  Jean-François Blanchette challenges this assumption as it applies to graduate students enrolled in LIS programs. He will argue that the teaching of coding aligns with a conception of computing primarily grounded in its mathematical character as an “engine of logic.” However, an equally important understanding of computing lies in its nature as an engineered system dedicated to the coordinated use of limited computing resources (processing, storage, networking). Of particular importance are the design strategies of modularity and hierarchical aggregation, which allows computing systems to allocate resources, manage complexity and technical change, while providing specific pathways for growth and functional evolution. These resources and strategies constitute the actual materials and tools used by engineers to design, operate, and maintain the extraordinarily complex assemblage of software and hardware components that constitutes networked computing.

For students, such as those in LIS, whose career success depends on the proper anticipation of the impact of information technology on their field of professional practice, such an understanding is more effective than learning to code. Using the PDF file format as example,  Jean-François Blanchette demonstrate how this approach can be used to anticipate the evolution of the format and its impact on, e.g., digital preservation, open data, accessibility, and the future of scholarly communication.

 

The Digital Humanities (DH) seminar series is aimed at providing a forum for relevant DH discussion in the region and beyond, inspiring collaboration with wider audiences about the emerging field of DH field and University’s DH Initiative, thus both strengthening the DH Initiative’s established network, as well as creating a space for collaboration between universities and cross-sectoral partners at national and international levels. Please find more information at their website.

The Seminars are open to everyone, but we would appreciate if you would register your attendance via dh@lnu.se

Call for Papers – Digital Humanities Congress 2018

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

The University of Sheffield’s Digital Humanities Institute is delighted to announce its Call for Papers for a three-day conference to be held in Sheffield, 6th – 8th September 2018. The Digital Humanities Congress is a conference held in Sheffield every two years. Its purpose is to promote the sharing of knowledge, ideas and techniques within the digital humanities.

Digital humanities is understood by Sheffield to mean the use of technology within arts, heritage and humanities research as both a method of inquiry and a means of dissemination. As such, proposals related to all disciplines within the arts, humanities and heritage domains are welcome. Proposals are welcome from academics, researchers, postgraduate students, professionals from within the cultural, heritage and information sectors, technologists and SMEs. Proposals are welcome from UK and international contributors. Contributors can propose individual papers, or sessions of three or more papers on a related theme.

Koraljka Golub from the Digital Humanities environment here at Linnaeus University encourage you to submit a paper and/or attend the congress. The deadline for submitting papers are on February 28th. For more information about the call see the congress website.

//Diana

Digital Humanities Seminar: Open Data in the Age of Big Data Capitalism – Arwid Lund

Tuesday, December 5th, 2017

Arwid Lund, Senior Lecturer at the Department of Cultural Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Linnaeus University will give a talk within the emerging field of Digital Humanities (DH) that is a part of the DH Seminar series hosted by the Digital Humanities Initiative at the Linnaeus University.

  • Date: 6 December 2017
  • Time: 13:00-14:00
  • Location: K1040, Building K, Växjö

Abstract: Open Data in the Age of Big Data Capitalism, Arwid Lund

The digital world has transformed the conditions for discussing freedom within liberalism. Private property more obviously clashes with the freedom of speech (the public sphere), when the costs of mediated and reproduced art, journalism, information and literature nears zero and the exchange of these takes fluid forms, similar to social communication. The concept of “open”, similar but still opposite to “free”, has taken on an accentuated ideological importance in this context, but so have also alternative visions of intellectual commons. This article contains a case study of Open Knowledge Network’s perspective on openness’ relation to private property and capitalism in the informational field. It does so first through an analysis of the network’s understanding of the copyleft principle, and second through an analysis of the organisation’s view on open business models. A theoretical reading of classical political perspectives on the concept of freedom supports the analysis. One result is the identification of a central ideological lacuna in absent discussions of unconditionally opened-up resources that strengthen the accumulation cycle of capital. This logic favours the negative freedom of closed business models in the competition with open ones that could foster more positive notions of freedom, although open business models are generally advocated and commons are mentioned as desirable. In a dominant ideological formation, openness is used to promote its opposite in the economic field. (more…)

Emerging Information Field, iSchools Organisation, and Potential for Linnaeus University

Thursday, November 2nd, 2017

Michael Seadle, Executive Director of iSchools and the Dean of Faculty of Arts at Humboldt University and Sam Oh, iCaucus Chair-elect and the Head of School of Library & Information Science and Data Science Department at Sungkyunkwan University will be talking about the emerging information field, organisation of iSchools and the potential it has for Linnaeus University and the region.

The core idea is to establish iSchool (information School) at Linnaeus University. An iSchool refers to university-level research and education in the information field (iField) which relies on interdisciplinary approaches to enrich and facilitate generation, transfer and curation of data, information, and knowledge by the widespread use of technology in order to maximize the potential of humans.

The iSchools Organization today involves over 70 prestigious universities from around the world such as: University of California, Berkeley; University College London; University of California, Los Angeles; Cornell University; Carnegie Mellon University; University of British Columbia; University of Hong Kong; Humboldt University of Berlin, to mention a few of those ranked among the top 50 universities in the world. The University of Washington was one of the first iSchools that was instrumental in developing the iSchools movement into what it is today.

More about the iSchools organization can be found at http://ischools.org and related project at Linnaeus University at https://lnu.se/en/research/searchresearch/forskningsprojekt/linnaeus-university-as-a-unique-ischool/

/Tamara Laketic