Events

Analysis of Image Captions in Scientific Publications

Tuesday, May 21st, 2019

On 28 May from 13 till 14.30, in F322 (Växjö) we will have a talk by a visiting professor to the iInstitute, Christian Wartena from University of Applied Sciences and Arts Hanover.

In the project NOA of the Technischen Informationsbibliothek (TIB) and the University of Applied Sciences and Arts Hanover we collect images with a free license from open access publications in order to make them available via Wikimedia Commons and thus to increase the potentials to reuse scientific images. In order to annotate and describe the content of the images techniques from image recognition are not suited.  Instead we analyze the captions and the passages referring to the image. We will show what specific problems the extraction of keywords from captions provides and how we solved them. Especially we will show, what role the imagery and concreteness of words, two notions form psycholinguistics, can play and how we can determine these values for arbitrary words.

Welcome!

For more information contact: Koraljka Golub – koraljka.golub@lnu.se

Seminar on Machine Learning in Industry on Friday May 10th

Thursday, May 9th, 2019

On Friday May 10, at 13.15-15.00, in D1136, Jonas Lundberg has three guest lecturers from industry giving a presentation about how machine learning is used in their companies.

It’s a part a course and is open for all students in Computer Science and Media Technology but we would also like to know staff  from DISA to attend the meeting if you are curios to know more about what is being done in industry

Each presenter will also present an exciting machine learning project they are currently working on.

Presenters:

  1. Antonina Danylenko, Viaplay, Stockholm
  2. Welf Löwe, Linnaeus university about collaborations with Softwerk, Växjö
  3. Linus Gustafsson, Fortnox, Växjö

If you have any questions please contact Jonas Lundberg – jonas.lundberg@lnu.se

//Diana

DISA at ICAME 40

Monday, January 28th, 2019

The 40th Annual Conference of the International Computer Archive for Modern and Medieval English (ICAME) will be held at Université de Neuchâtel in Switzerland, June 1 – 5. ICAME is one of the most important ongoing conference series on corpus linguistics, and since this is the 40th installment it is something of an anniversary. The theme this year is “Language in Time, Time in Language”.

This year we are happy to see that we have many of our researchers connected to DISA present to represent us and the research conducted at Linnaeus University.

The conference activities connected to DISA LNU are:

  • Jukka Tyrkkö will be organizing a workshop called “Big data and the study of language and culture: Parliamentary discourse across time and space” together with Minna Korhonen and Haidee Kruger.
  • Mikko Laitinen is presenting a paper on variation in indefinite pronouns in historical American English called “Towards the Inevitable Demise of Everybody?” together with Emily Öhman and Tanja Säily.
  • Magnus Levin and Jenny Ström Herold will present on echoic binomials in an English-German-Swedish perspective as a part of the “Languages in Time, Time in Languages: Phraseological perspectives” workshop.
  • Mikko Laitinen, Jukka Tyrkkö, Magnus Levin, Alexander Lakaw and Daniel Sundberg will be presenting a paper on the use of American English and British English in the Nordic context through the Nordic Tweet Stream.

For more information about the research within the research group for Data Intensive Digital Humanities, visit their website.

/Diana

Digital Humanities Day with DARIAH on 30 October 2018

Tuesday, October 2nd, 2018

Welcome to a Digital Humanities Day with Frank Fischer, Associate Professor for Digital Humanities at the Higher School of Economics, Moscow, and co-director of DARIAH-EU. Frank Fischer will talk about his own research on digital perspectives for the study of European Drama as well as DARIAH:s work for the Pan-European Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities.

Programme
10.00-11.00 “Masks and Interfaces – Digital Perspectives for the Study of European Drama” * See abstract below.
11.00-13.00 Lunch
13:00-14.00 “A Social Marketplace for Services – Introduction to DARIAH, the Pan-European Infrastructure for the Arts and Humanities”
14.00-14.30 Coffee
14.30-15.30 Discussion

Registration kerstin.broden@lnu.se. Please advise of any food allergies.

Co-organised by the Digital Humanities Initiative and iInstitute

* Abstract: The digital literary studies have offered a lot of new approaches to the study of drama in recent years. New methods like social network analysis, stylometry and other quantitative and statistical approaches are complemented by a rich landscape of literary data in many languages and formats. This talk will recap these developments, oscillating between research and infrastructure, and introduce a platform for the research on European drama.

Seminar – How to get published with IEEE

Wednesday, September 12th, 2018

On September 19 at 10:00-11:30 Linnaeus University will be visited by Paul Henriques from IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers). Paul will host a seminar on the topic “How to get published with IEEE”:

Increase the visibility of your research and build author credibility by publishing in a leading IEEE journal or conference. Learn how to identify the best journal or conference for your work and navigate the IEEE paper submission and peer review process. Review the required elements and proper structure of a manuscript to avoid reasons why papers may be rejected.

The presentation is in English. The seminar takes place in Växjö (location: Babel at the University Library) but will also be streamed to Kalmar (location: UB296A at the University Library).

Registration and more information:

//Diana

Second Keynote speaker at VINCI 2018 is Keynote Speech 2: Design after Nature Prof. Jon McCormack, Monash University, Australia

Friday, June 29th, 2018

We have the pleasure to present the second keynote speaker at VINCI 2018 Prof. Jon McCormack, Monash University, Australia on Design after Nature. You can find information on how to register for VINCI 2018 here

Abstract: Nature has driven us in what and how we create for millennia. Biomimetic approaches to human design are inspired by natural forms, shapes and processes. In computing, nature-inspired algorithms mimic collective behaviour or biological evolution to solve hard problems in search, optimisation and learning. In this talk I’ll show how I have developed a creative visual design practice informed by processes from biological development, the architecture of natural form, and evolutionary processes. My work began by devising advanced visual models of morphogenetic development in plants. Incorporating evolutionary processes allowed designs to emerge that would be difficult or impossible to discover independently, making them “beyond human design”. In later work, I have experimented with evolutionary ecosystems and processes such as niche construction to encourage diversity in the visual style of works generated by algorithmic processes. My most recent work looks at translating from the virtual back to the real, using digital fabrication technologies driven by generative computational processes. The goal is to build dynamic, responsive, intelligent physical systems that interact directly with living organisms, symbiotically affecting their growth and development. This leads to the creation of bio-machine hybrids – bringing the biomimetic concept full circle – and heralding a new form of co-design where human, machine and nature all contribute to the design process.

Photo of Jon McCormack

Short Bio: Jon McCormack is an Australian-based artist and researcher in computing. He holds an Honours degree in Applied Mathematics and Computer Science from Monash University, a Graduate Diploma of Art (Film and Television) from Swinburne University and a PhD in Computer Science from Monash University. He is currently full Professor of Computer Science and director of sensiLab at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia. His research interests include generative art, design and music, evolutionary systems, computer creativity, visualisation, virtual reality, interaction design, physical computing, machine learning, L-systems and developmental models.

Since the late 1980s McCormack has worked with computer code as a medium for creative expression. Inspired by the complexity and wonder of a diminishing natural world, his work is concerned with electronic “after natures” – alternate forms of artificial life that may one day replace the biological nature lost through human progress and development. For more information about Jon Cormack see.